Federal Survey Cards Due September 7. Jamba Juice After school Friday, September 8.  'Ohana Night September 22.

Kahala Elementary School

News and Announcements

AHERA - Annual Notification

In 1968, Congress passed the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA).  This law requires all K-12 schools to be inspected to identify any asbestos-containing building materials.
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Teacher Qualifications

As a parent/guardian of a Hawaii Department of Education student, you have the right to know the professional qualifications of the classroom teacher(s) who instruct your child. Federal Law allows you to ask for certain information about your child’s classroom teacher(s) and requires us to give you this information in a timely manner upon request.
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Welcome To Kahala!

Yesterday, we had a short assembly to welcome over 40 new children to Kahala (grades 1-5). We also welcomed three of our four new teachers: Ms. Chu, Ms. Doolin, and Ms. Harris.
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Welcome Back!

Today was the first day of school, and although some students were a bit apprehensive, most were enthusiastic about getting back to school. It's been a long summer, and we are anxious to get learning! Have a wonderful year!
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A+ Program

Kama'aina Kids will be our provider for A+ this school year. Parents are encouraged to register children and contact Kama'aina Kids with any questions or concerns. E-mail our site director at sakahala@kamaainakids.com or call 733-8455, ext 240. Applications are also available in our front office. Click this link to be directed to Kama'aina Kids' website and learn more about monthly rates, hours of operation, etc. Early morning care will also be available for families needing child care before school. Aloha!
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PERSISTING - Habit of Mind for the New Year

Success seems to be connected with action. Successful people keep moving. They make mistakes, but they never quit.
—Conrad Hilton

Efficacious people stick to a task until it is completed. They donʻt give up easily. They are able to analyze a problem, and they develop a system, structure, or strategy to attack it. Because they are able to sustain a problem-solving process over time, they are comfortable with ambiguous situations.
Students often give up when they donʻt immediately know the answer to a problem. They sometimes crumple their papers and throw them away, exclaiming " canʻt do this!" or "Itʻs too hard!" Sometimes they write down any answer to get the task over with as quickly as possible. They need to develop strategies to persist through these challenges, and we will continue to teach our students multiple ways to attack a difficult task.
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